Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 1 Definition of types of food stores used in this study [52]

From: Association between proximity to and coverage of traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets and fast-food consumption among rural adults

Supercenters or superstores Very large stores that primarily engage in retailing a general line of groceries in combination with general lines of new merchandise, such as apparel, furniture, and appliances (e.g., Super Wal-Mart, Super Kmart).
Supermarkets Primarily engage in retailing a general line of food, supermarkets are larger in size (>20,000 sq ft), number of employees, and sales volume {Alwitt, 1997 #3550}. Chain store identification and number of parking spaces (>100) were used to distinguish supermarkets from grocery stores {Hale, 2004 #3377;Sharkey, 2009 #3556}.
Grocery stores Primarily engage in retailing a general line of food, grocery stores are smaller in size, not identified as a chain store and have fewer than 100 parking spaces.
Convenience stores or food marts Primarily engage in retailing a limited line of goods that generally includes milk, bread, soda, and snacks. The convenience store category also included convenience stores with gasoline and gasoline stations with convenience stores.
Mass merchandisers Large, general merchandise "value" stores, such as Kmart, Target, and Wal-Mart.
Dollar stores Limited-price general merchandise "value" stores, such as Dollar General or Family Dollar {Hale, 2004 #3377;Leibtag, 2005 #3375}.
Pharmacies and drug stores Pharmacies and drug stores that were part of national chains (e.g., CVS, Walgreens).
  1. Reprinted with permission: Sharkey et al. International Journal of Health Geographics 2010, 9:26 [52]