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Table 2 Descriptive statistics for NC on the Move analytic sample study participants (n = 94)

From: Associations between BMI and home, school and route environmental exposures estimated using GPS and GIS: do we see evidence of selective daily mobility bias in children?

   Count (%), or median, IQR, unless otherwise stated
   Girls Boys All
Number of children   46 (48.9) 48 (51.1) 94 (100.0)
Number of trips   392 (50.6) 383 (49.4) 775 (100.0)
Age in years (mean, SD)   7.96, 1.62 8.13, 2.10 8.04, 1.85
Child BMI z-score a   0.80, −0.05–1.78 0.95, 0.14–1.67 0.88, −0.04–1.72
Child race White 38 (82.6) 41 (85.4) 79 (84.0)
Household income Up to $15,000 2 (4.3) 5 (10.4) 7 (7.4)
$15,001 to $30,000 5 (10.9) 10 (20.8) 15 (16.0)
$30,001 to $60,000 10 (21.7) 4 (8.3) 14 (14.9)
$60,001, to $90,000 10 (21.7) 16 (33.3) 26 (27.7)
More than $90,001 19 (41.3) 12 (25.0) 31 (33.0)
Parent education level 1st to 8th grade 1 (2.2) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.1)
9th to 12th grade 2 (4.3) 3 (6.3) 5 (5.3)
Vocational or some college 8 (17.4) 14 (29.2) 22 (23.4)
College graduate 19 (41.3) 13 (27.1) 32 (34.0)
Graduate or professional school 16 (34.8) 18 (37.5) 34 (36.2)
Child’s most frequent mode of travel to school per week On foot 1 (2.2) 2 (4.2) 3 (3.2)
Bus 12 (26.1) 14 (29.2) 26 (27.7)
Car 25 (54.3) 27 (56.3) 52 (55.3)
Multi-modalb 8 (17.4) 5 (10.4) 13 (13.9)
  1. aBMI z-scores calculated relative to age-specific US national height and weight distributions, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  2. bDefined as the equal use of two or more different travel modes for journeys to and from school per week. NB All multi-modal commute patterns contained at least one form of motorised transport in this sample.