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Table 2 Contrasta of percent of sit-down restaurantsb and supermarketsc for each neighborhood typed pair in 1993

From: A method for estimating neighborhood characterization in studies of the association with availability of sit-down restaurants and supermarkets

  Urban core Inner city Urban Aging suburb High-income suburb Suburban edge
Sit-down restaurant model: estimated beta (95% confidence interval)
 Urban core
 Inner city − 27.13
(− 28.62, − 25.63)
 Urban − 26.61
(− 29.45, − 23.77)
0.51
(− 1.71, 2.74)
 Aging suburb − 28.82
(− 30.25, − 27.39)
− 1.69
(− 2.82, − 0.57)
− 2.21
(− 3.29, − 1.11)
 High-income suburb − 31.69
(− 32.90, − 30.48)
− 4.57
(− 5.52, − 3.61)
− 5.08
(− 6.37, − 3.78)
− 2.87
(− 3.56, − 2.18)
 Suburban edge − 35.48
(− 36.50, − 34.47)
− 8.36
(− 9.15, − 7.56)
− 8.87
(− 9.81, − 7.93)
− 6.67
(− 7.18, − 6.14)
− 3.79
(− 4.31, − 3.27)
Supermarket model: estimated beta (95% confidence interval)
 Urban core
 Inner city − 1.87
(− 6.24, 2.50)
 Urban − 1.41
(− 5.33, 2.51)
0.46
(− 2.67, 3.59)
 Aging suburb − 0.18
(− 4.11, 3.75)
1.69
(− 1.39, 4.77)
1.23
(− 0.66, 3.12)
 High-income suburb − 0.58
(− 4.78, 3.63)
1.30
(− 2.07, 4.66)
0.84
(− 1.38, 3.06)
− 0.39
(− 2.30, 1.51)
 Suburban edge − 1.68
(− 5.83, 2.46)
0.19
(− 3.08, 3.46)
− 0.27
(− 2.29, 1.75)
− 1.50
(− 3.13, 0.13)
− 1.11
(− 2.94, 0.73)
  1. Italics indicates significant difference in percent of sit-down restaurants or percent of supermarkets across neighborhood type at the 0.05 significance level
  2. aMultivariable linear mixed effects regressions modeling the percent of sit-down restaurants relative to total sit-down restaurants and fast food restaurants and percent of supermarkets relative to total supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores as functions of neighborhood type in 1993, time elapsed since 1993, interaction between neighborhood type in 1993 and time elapsed, change in employment population density (sit-down restaurant model only), change in residential population density (supermarket model only), median household income, percent of white race and percent of single-family housing since 1993, total sit-down restaurants and fast food restaurants (sit-down restaurant model only), and total supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores (supermarket model only) and a random intercept for each neighborhood
  3. bPercent of sit-down restaurants relative to total sit-down restaurants and fast food restaurants in the neighborhood
  4. cPercent of supermarkets relative to total supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores in the neighborhood
  5. dDerived from cluster analysis of block-group level data from 1993: percent of population aged under 14, aged 15–29, 30–44, 45–64, and aged above 65, percent of education of college or above, percent of white race, percent of black race, median household income, residential population density, employment population density, mix of land use and percent of single-family housing