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  1. This research concerns Araucanía, often called the Ninth Region, the poorest region of Chile where inequalities are most extreme. Araucanía hasn't enjoyed the economic success Chile achieved when the country retu...

    Authors: Flavio Rojas
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:26
  2. Vehicle traffic is the major source of noise in urban environments, which in turn has multiple impacts on health. In this paper we investigate the spatial distribution of community noise exposures and annoyanc...

    Authors: Edmund Yet Wah Seto, Ashley Holt, Tom Rivard and Rajiv Bhatia
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:24
  3. Infant immunisation is an effective public health intervention to reduce the morbidity and mortality of vaccine preventable diseases. However, some developing countries fail to achieve desirable vaccination co...

    Authors: Taufiq Mashal, Keiko Nakamura, Masashi Kizuki, Kaoruko Seino and Takehito Takano
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:23
  4. The motivation for this paper is to inform the selection of future policy directions for tackling HIV/AIDS in Russia. The Russian Federation has more people living with HIV/AIDS than any other country in Europ...

    Authors: Dominique Moran and Jacob A Jordaan
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:22
  5. We examined algorithms for malaria mapping using the impact of reflectance calibration uncertainties on the accuracies of three vegetation indices (VI)'s derived from QuickBird data in three rice agro-village ...

    Authors: Benjamin G Jacob, Ephantus J Muturi, Joseph M Mwangangi, Jose Funes, Erick X Caamano, Simon Muriu, Josephat Shililu, John Githure and Robert J Novak
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:21
  6. The aims of this study were to determine if observed geographic variations in colorectal cancer incidence are simply random or are statistically significant deviations from randomness, whether statistically si...

    Authors: Laurie M DeChello and T Joseph Sheehan
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:20
  7. This study is part of several ongoing projects concerning epidemiological research into the effects on health of exposure to air pollutants in the region of Scania, southern Sweden. The aim is to investigate t...

    Authors: Emilie Stroh, Lars Harrie and Susanna Gustafsson
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:19
  8. Levels of byproducts that result from the disinfection of drinking water vary within a water distribution system. This prompted us to question whether the risk for rectal cancer also varies, depending upon one...

    Authors: Gerald E Bove Jr, Peter A Rogerson and John E Vena
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:18
  9. Over the past several decades researchers have produced substantial evidence of a social gradient in a variety of health outcomes, rising from systematic differences in income, education, employment conditions...

    Authors: Nathaniel Bell, Nadine Schuurman and Michael V Hayes
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:17
  10. Vector-borne and zoonotic diseases generally display clear spatial patterns due to different space-dependent factors. Land cover and land use influence disease transmission by controlling both the spatial dist...

    Authors: Catherine Linard, Pénélope Lamarque, Paul Heyman, Geneviève Ducoffre, Victor Luyasu, Katrien Tersago, Sophie O Vanwambeke and Eric F Lambin
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:15
  11. With the objective of identifying spatial and temporal patterns of enzootic raccoon variant rabies, a spatial scan statistic was utilized to search for significant terrestrial rabies clusters by year in New Yo...

    Authors: Sergio Recuenco, Millicent Eidson, Martin Kulldorff, Glen Johnson and Bryan Cherry
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:14
  12. Spatial cluster detection is an important tool in cancer surveillance to identify areas of elevated risk and to generate hypotheses about cancer etiology. There are many cluster detection methods used in spati...

    Authors: David C Wheeler
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:13
  13. Geocoding methods vary among spatial epidemiology studies. Errors in the geocoding process and differential match rates may reduce study validity. We compared two geocoding methods using 8,157 Washington State...

    Authors: Gina S Lovasi, Jeremy C Weiss, Richard Hoskins, Eric A Whitsel, Kenneth Rice, Craig F Erickson and Bruce M Psaty
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:12
  14. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used in a wide variety of applications to integrate data and explore the spatial relationship of geographic features. Traditionally this has referred to features ...

    Authors: Jane L Garb, Sabha Ganai, Ric Skinner, Christopher S Boyd and Richard B Wait
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:11
  15. West Nile virus infection in humans in urban areas of the Midwestern United States has exhibited strong spatial clustering during epidemic years. We derived urban landscape classes from the physical and socio-...

    Authors: Marilyn O Ruiz, Edward D Walker, Erik S Foster, Linn D Haramis and Uriel D Kitron
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:10
  16. Recent advances in mobile positioning systems and telecommunications are providing the technology needed for the development of location-aware tele-care applications. This paper introduces CAALYX – Complete Am...

    Authors: Maged N Kamel Boulos, Artur Rocha, Angelo Martins, Manuel Escriche Vicente, Armin Bolz, Robert Feld, Igor Tchoudovski, Martin Braecklein, John Nelson, Gearóid Ó Laighin, Claudio Sdogati, Francesca Cesaroni, Marco Antomarini, Angela Jobes and Mark Kinirons
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:9
  17. Reducing the potential for large scale loss of life, large numbers of casualties, and widespread displacement of populations that can result from natural disasters is a difficult challenge for the individuals,...

    Authors: Zine El Abidine El Morjani, Steeve Ebener, John Boos, Eman Abdel Ghaffar and Altaf Musani
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:8
  18. Hydropower plants provide more than 78 % of Brazil's electricity generation, but the country's reservoirs are potential new habitats for main vectors of malaria. In a case study in the surroundings of the Mans...

    Authors: Peter Zeilhofer, Emerson Soares dos Santos, Ana LM Ribeiro, Rosina D Miyazaki and Marina Atanaka dos Santos
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:7
  19. The threat posed by the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) within the United States has grown significantly in recent years, focusing attention on the medical and public health disaster capabilities of t...

    Authors: William C Bell and Cham E Dallas
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:5
  20. Access to varied, healthy and inexpensive foods is an important public health concern that has been widely documented. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in identifying food deserts, that is, social...

    Authors: Philippe Apparicio, Marie-Soleil Cloutier and Richard Shearmur
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:4
  21. The objective of this evaluation was to determine whether reports of dead corvid sightings and submissions of dead corvids for West Nile virus testing were representative of true corvid mortality in British Co...

    Authors: Samara T David, Sunny Mak, Laura MacDougall and Murray Fyfe
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:3
  22. The highlands of Madagascar present an unstable transmission pattern of malaria. The population has no immunity, and the central highlands have been the sites of epidemics with particularly high fatality. The ...

    Authors: Fanjasoa Rakotomanana, Rindra V Randremanana, Léon P Rabarijaona, Jean Bernard Duchemin, Jocelyn Ratovonjato, Frédéric Ariey, Jean Paul Rudant and Isabelle Jeanne
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:2
  23. The assignment of a point-level geocode to subjects' residences is an important data assimilation component of many geographic public health studies. Often, these assignments are made by a method known as auto...

    Authors: Dale L Zimmerman, Xiangming Fang, Soumya Mazumdar and Gerard Rushton
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2007 6:1
  24. The present paper deals with the relationship between health indicators and human development in the Arab region. Beyond descriptive analysis showing geographic similarities and disparities inter countries, th...

    Authors: Abdesslam Boutayeb and Mansour Serghini
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:61
  25. El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate anomalies have been shown to have an impact on infectious disease outbreaks. The Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra...

    Authors: Assaf Anyamba, Jean-Paul Chretien, Jennifer Small, Compton J Tucker and Kenneth J Linthicum
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:60
  26. This study evaluated geographic distribution of race-specific prostate cancer incidence in Connecticut and Massachusetts. This cross-sectional analysis of census and cancer registry data included records of 29...

    Authors: Laurie M DeChello, David I Gregorio and Holly Samociuk
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:59
  27. While the use of spatially referenced data for the analysis of epidemiological data is growing, issues associated with selecting the appropriate geographic unit of analysis are also emerging. A particularly pr...

    Authors: Tony H Grubesic and Timothy C Matisziw
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:58
  28. There are few studies that have investigated uncertainties surrounding the scientific community's knowledge of the geographical distribution of major animal diseases. This is particularly relevant to Rift Vall...

    Authors: Archie CA Clements, Dirk U Pfeiffer and Vincent Martin
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:57
  29. Widespread availability of geographic information systems software has facilitated the use of disease mapping in academia, government and private sector. Maps that display the address of affected patients are ...

    Authors: John S Brownstein, Christopher A Cassa, Isaac S Kohane and Kenneth D Mandl
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:56
  30. The growing interest in the effects of contextual environments on health outcomes has focused attention on the strengths and weaknesses of alternate contextual unit definitions for use in multilevel analysis. ...

    Authors: Zaria Tatalovich, John P Wilson, Joel E Milam, Michael Jerrett and Rob McConnell
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:55
  31. Ecologic studies have shown a relationship between alcohol outlet densities, illicit drug use and violence. The present study examined this relationship in the City of Houston, Texas, using a sample of 439 cen...

    Authors: Li Zhu, Dennis M Gorman and Scott Horel
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:54
  32. Geostatistical techniques that account for spatially varying population sizes and spatial patterns in the filtering of choropleth maps of cancer mortality were recently developed. Their implementation was faci...

    Authors: Pierre Goovaerts
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:52
  33. Cancer control researchers seek to reduce the burden of cancer by studying interventions, their impact in defined populations, and the means by which they can be better used. The first step in cancer control i...

    Authors: Linda Williams Pickle, Martha Szczur, Denise Riedel Lewis and David G Stinchcomb
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:51
  34. To communicate population-based cancer statistics, cancer researchers have a long tradition of presenting data in a spatial representation, or map. Historically, health data were presented in printed atlases i...

    Authors: B Sue Bell, Richard E Hoskins, Linda Williams Pickle and Daniel Wartenberg
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:49
  35. Maptaphut Industrial Estate (MIE) was established with a single factory in 1988, increasing to 50 by 1998. This development has resulted in undesirable impacts on the environment and the health of the people i...

    Authors: Somchai Jadsri, Pratap Singhasivanon, Jaranit Kaewkungwal, Rattana Sithiprasasna, Somkiat Siriruttanapruk and Supawadee Konchom
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:48
  36. Oral rabies vaccination programs have been implemented to control the spread of wildlife rabies in the United States. However, current surveillance systems are inadequate for the efficient management and evalu...

    Authors: Jesse D Blanton, Arie Manangan, Jamie Manangan, Cathleen A Hanlon, Dennis Slate and Charles E Rupprecht
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:47
  37. Geographic regions are often routinely monitored to identify areas with excess cases of disease. Further epidemiological investigations can be targeted to areas with higher disease rates than expected. Surveil...

    Authors: Rhonda J Rosychuk
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:46
  38. Disease maps can serve to display incidence rates geographically, to inform on public health provision about the success or failure of interventions, and to make hypothesis or to provide evidences concerning d...

    Authors: Mohammad Ali, Pierre Goovaerts, Nushrat Nazia, M Zahirul Haq, Mohammad Yunus and Michael Emch
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:45
  39. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating i...

    Authors: Andrew J Curtis, Jacqueline W Mills and Michael Leitner
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:44
  40. Cost containment typically involves rationalizing healthcare service delivery through centralization of services to achieve economies of scale. Hospitals are frequently the chosen site of cost containment and ...

    Authors: Nadine Schuurman, Robert S Fiedler, Stefan CW Grzybowski and Darrin Grund
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:43
  41. Community hospital placement is dictated by a diverse set of geographical factors and historical contingency. In the summer of 2004, a multi-organizational committee headed by the State of Michigan's Departmen...

    Authors: Joseph P Messina, Ashton M Shortridge, Richard E Groop, Pariwate Varnakovida and Mark J Finn
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:42
  42. Current malaria control initiatives aim at reducing malaria burden by half by the year 2010. Effective control requires evidence-based utilisation of resources. Characterizing spatial patterns of risk, through...

    Authors: Lawrence N Kazembe, Immo Kleinschmidt, Timothy H Holtz and Brian L Sharp
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:41
  43. An increasing number of studies use GIS estimates of car travel times to health services, without presenting any evidence that the estimates are representative of real travel times. This investigation compared...

    Authors: Robin Haynes, Andrew P Jones, Violet Sauerzapf and Hongxin Zhao
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:40
  44. A Community health assessment (CHA) involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solvi...

    Authors: Matthew Scotch, Bambang Parmanto, Cynthia S Gadd and Ravi K Sharma
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:39
  45. To explain the possible effects of exposure to weather conditions on population health outcomes, weather data need to be calculated at a level in space and time that is appropriate for the health data. There a...

    Authors: Ivan Hanigan, Gillian Hall and Keith BG Dear
    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:38

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