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  1. There are few studies that have investigated uncertainties surrounding the scientific community's knowledge of the geographical distribution of major animal diseases. This is particularly relevant to Rift Vall...

    Authors: Archie CA Clements, Dirk U Pfeiffer and Vincent Martin

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:57

    Content type: Research

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  2. Widespread availability of geographic information systems software has facilitated the use of disease mapping in academia, government and private sector. Maps that display the address of affected patients are ...

    Authors: John S Brownstein, Christopher A Cassa, Isaac S Kohane and Kenneth D Mandl

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:56

    Content type: Methodology

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  3. The growing interest in the effects of contextual environments on health outcomes has focused attention on the strengths and weaknesses of alternate contextual unit definitions for use in multilevel analysis. ...

    Authors: Zaria Tatalovich, John P Wilson, Joel E Milam, Michael Jerrett and Rob McConnell

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:55

    Content type: Research

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  4. Ecologic studies have shown a relationship between alcohol outlet densities, illicit drug use and violence. The present study examined this relationship in the City of Houston, Texas, using a sample of 439 cen...

    Authors: Li Zhu, Dennis M Gorman and Scott Horel

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:54

    Content type: Research

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  5. Geostatistical techniques that account for spatially varying population sizes and spatial patterns in the filtering of choropleth maps of cancer mortality were recently developed. Their implementation was faci...

    Authors: Pierre Goovaerts

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:52

    Content type: Methodology

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  6. Cancer control researchers seek to reduce the burden of cancer by studying interventions, their impact in defined populations, and the means by which they can be better used. The first step in cancer control i...

    Authors: Linda Williams Pickle, Martha Szczur, Denise Riedel Lewis and David G Stinchcomb

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:51

    Content type: Review

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  7. To communicate population-based cancer statistics, cancer researchers have a long tradition of presenting data in a spatial representation, or map. Historically, health data were presented in printed atlases i...

    Authors: B Sue Bell, Richard E Hoskins, Linda Williams Pickle and Daniel Wartenberg

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:49

    Content type: Review

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  8. Maptaphut Industrial Estate (MIE) was established with a single factory in 1988, increasing to 50 by 1998. This development has resulted in undesirable impacts on the environment and the health of the people i...

    Authors: Somchai Jadsri, Pratap Singhasivanon, Jaranit Kaewkungwal, Rattana Sithiprasasna, Somkiat Siriruttanapruk and Supawadee Konchom

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:48

    Content type: Research

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  9. Oral rabies vaccination programs have been implemented to control the spread of wildlife rabies in the United States. However, current surveillance systems are inadequate for the efficient management and evalu...

    Authors: Jesse D Blanton, Arie Manangan, Jamie Manangan, Cathleen A Hanlon, Dennis Slate and Charles E Rupprecht

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:47

    Content type: Methodology

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  10. Geographic regions are often routinely monitored to identify areas with excess cases of disease. Further epidemiological investigations can be targeted to areas with higher disease rates than expected. Surveil...

    Authors: Rhonda J Rosychuk

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:46

    Content type: Methodology

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  11. Disease maps can serve to display incidence rates geographically, to inform on public health provision about the success or failure of interventions, and to make hypothesis or to provide evidences concerning d...

    Authors: Mohammad Ali, Pierre Goovaerts, Nushrat Nazia, M Zahirul Haq, Mohammad Yunus and Michael Emch

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:45

    Content type: Methodology

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  12. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating i...

    Authors: Andrew J Curtis, Jacqueline W Mills and Michael Leitner

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:44

    Content type: Methodology

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  13. Cost containment typically involves rationalizing healthcare service delivery through centralization of services to achieve economies of scale. Hospitals are frequently the chosen site of cost containment and ...

    Authors: Nadine Schuurman, Robert S Fiedler, Stefan CW Grzybowski and Darrin Grund

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:43

    Content type: Research

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  14. Community hospital placement is dictated by a diverse set of geographical factors and historical contingency. In the summer of 2004, a multi-organizational committee headed by the State of Michigan's Departmen...

    Authors: Joseph P Messina, Ashton M Shortridge, Richard E Groop, Pariwate Varnakovida and Mark J Finn

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:42

    Content type: Research

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  15. Current malaria control initiatives aim at reducing malaria burden by half by the year 2010. Effective control requires evidence-based utilisation of resources. Characterizing spatial patterns of risk, through...

    Authors: Lawrence N Kazembe, Immo Kleinschmidt, Timothy H Holtz and Brian L Sharp

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:41

    Content type: Research

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  16. An increasing number of studies use GIS estimates of car travel times to health services, without presenting any evidence that the estimates are representative of real travel times. This investigation compared...

    Authors: Robin Haynes, Andrew P Jones, Violet Sauerzapf and Hongxin Zhao

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:40

    Content type: Research

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  17. A Community health assessment (CHA) involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solvi...

    Authors: Matthew Scotch, Bambang Parmanto, Cynthia S Gadd and Ravi K Sharma

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:39

    Content type: Research

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  18. To explain the possible effects of exposure to weather conditions on population health outcomes, weather data need to be calculated at a level in space and time that is appropriate for the health data. There a...

    Authors: Ivan Hanigan, Gillian Hall and Keith BG Dear

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:38

    Content type: Methodology

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  19. Geographical information systems (GIS) have been used mainly in understanding infectious diseases and environmental threats in health research. Here, GIS was used to examine patterns of functional disability a...

    Authors: Margaret P Moss, Matthew C Schell and R Turner Goins

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:37

    Content type: Research

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  20. West Nile virus (WNV) poses a significant health risk for residents of Mississippi. Physicians and state health officials are interested in new and efficient methods for monitoring disease spread and predictin...

    Authors: William H Cooke III, Katarzyna Grala and Robert C Wallis

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:36

    Content type: Research

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  21. Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading clinical manifestation of HIV infection and caseloads continue to increase in high HIV prevalence settings. TB treatment is prolonged and treatment interruption has serious ind...

    Authors: Barry Dwolatzky, Estelle Trengove, Helen Struthers, James A McIntyre and Neil A Martinson

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:34

    Content type: Methodology

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  22. The World Health Organization has declared tuberculosis a global emergency in 1993. It has been estimated that one third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of...

    Authors: Neeraj Tiwari, CMS Adhikari, Ajoy Tewari and Vineeta Kandpal

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:33

    Content type: Research

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  23. Methods for analyzing space-time variation in risk in case-control studies typically ignore residential mobility. We develop an approach for analyzing case-control data for mobile individuals and apply it to s...

    Authors: Geoffrey M Jacquez, Jaymie R Meliker, Gillian A AvRuskin, Pierre Goovaerts, Andy Kaufmann, Mark L Wilson and Jerome Nriagu

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:32

    Content type: Methodology

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  24. To determine patterns of childhood lead exposure in a community living near a lead and zinc smelter in North Lake Macquarie, Australia between 1991 and 2002.

    Authors: Alan Willmore, Tim Sladden, Lucy Bates and Craig B Dalton

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:30

    Content type: Research

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  25. Geographic patterns of cancer death rates in the U.S. have customarily been presented by county or aggregated into state economic or health service areas. Herein, we present the geographic patterns of cancer d...

    Authors: Yongping Hao, Elizabeth M Ward, Ahmedin Jemal, Linda W Pickle and Michael J Thun

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:28

    Content type: Methodology

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  26. In this paper we analyse the Plasmodium sp. prevalence in three villages with different isolation status on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea) where malaria is a hyper-endemic disease. We also describe the g...

    Authors: Ana Guerra-Neira, José M Rubio, Jesús Roche Royo, Jorge Cano Ortega, Antonio Sarrión Auñón, Pedro Berzosa Diaz and Agustín Benito LLanes

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:27

    Content type: Research

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  27. Mapping spatial distributions of disease occurrence and risk can serve as a useful tool for identifying exposures of public health concern. Disease registry data are often mapped by town or county of diagnosis...

    Authors: Thomas Webster, Verónica Vieira, Janice Weinberg and Ann Aschengrau

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:26

    Content type: Research

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  28. In Japan, the emergency medical system is categorized into three levels: primary, secondary, and tertiary, depending on the severity of the condition of the patient. Tertiary care centres accept patients who r...

    Authors: Makiko Miwa, Hiroyuki Kawaguchi, Hideaki Arima and Kazuo Kawahara

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:25

    Content type: Research

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  29. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are powerful communication tools for public health. However, using GIS requires considerable skill and, for this reason, is sometimes limited to experts. Web-based GIS has ...

    Authors: Raoul Kamadjeu and Herman Tolentino

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:24

    Content type: Methodology

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  30. Assessments of environmental exposure and health risks that utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS) often make simplifying assumptions when using: (a) one or more discrete buffer distances to define the s...

    Authors: Paul A Zandbergen and Jayajit Chakraborty

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:23

    Content type: Methodology

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  31. Area-level socioeconomic disparities have long been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Crime is an important element of the neighborhood environment inadequately investigated in the reproductive and p...

    Authors: Lynne C Messer, Jay S Kaufman, Nancy Dole, Amy Herring and Barbara A Laraia

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:22

    Content type: Research

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  32. West Nile virus (WNv) has recently emerged as a health threat to the North American population. After the initial disease outbreak in New York City in 1999, WNv has spread widely and quickly across North Ameri...

    Authors: Kaoru Tachiiri, Brian Klinkenberg, Sunny Mak and Jamil Kazmi

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:21

    Content type: Research

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  33. On the fringes of endemic zones climate is a major determinant of inter-annual variation in malaria incidence. Quantitative description of the space-time effect of this association has practical implications f...

    Authors: Musawenkoi LH Mabaso, Penelope Vounatsou, Stanely Midzi, Joaquim Da Silva and Thomas Smith

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:20

    Content type: Research

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  34. Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs) are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admission...

    Authors: Lee R Mobley, Elisabeth Root, Luc Anselin, Nancy Lozano-Gracia and Julia Koschinsky

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:19

    Content type: Research

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  35. Continuous land cover modification is an important part of spatial epidemiology because it can help identify environmental factors and Culex mosquitoes associated with arbovirus transmission and thus guide contro...

    Authors: Benjamin G Jacob, Josephat Shililu, Ephantus J Muturi, Joseph M Mwangangi, Simon M Muriu, Jose Funes, John Githure, James L Regens and Robert J Novak

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:18

    Content type: Research

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  36. An extensive West Nile virus surveillance program of dead birds, mosquitoes, horses, and human infection has been launched as a result of West Nile virus first being reported in Canada in 2001. Some desktop an...

    Authors: Jiangping Shuai, Peter Buck, Paul Sockett, Jeff Aramini and Frank Pollari

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:17

    Content type: Methodology

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  37. Assessment of the spatial accessibility of hospital accident and emergency departments as perceived by local residents has not previously been investigated. Perceived accessibility may affect where, when, and ...

    Authors: David L Fone, Stephen Christie and Nathan Lester

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:16

    Content type: Research

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  38. Cluster detection is an important part of spatial epidemiology because it can help identifying environmental factors associated with disease and thus guide investigation of the aetiology of diseases. In this a...

    Authors: Geir Aamodt, Sven O Samuelsen and Anders Skrondal

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:15

    Content type: Research

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  39. The neighborhood social and physical environments are considered significant factors contributing to children's inactive lifestyles, poor eating habits, and high levels of childhood obesity. Understanding of n...

    Authors: Xingyou Zhang, Katherine Kaufer Christoffel, Maryann Mason and Lin Liu

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:14

    Content type: Methodology

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  40. To better understand the distribution of typhoid outbreaks in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) conducted four investigations of typhoid fever. These studies included maps of cases reporte...

    Authors: Sarah E Hinman, Jason K Blackburn and Andrew Curtis

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:13

    Content type: Research

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  41. Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with poor maternal and child health outcomes, yet conceptualization of potential mechanisms is still needed. Census data have long served as proxies for area l...

    Authors: Barbara A Laraia, Lynne Messer, Jay S Kaufman, Nancy Dole, Margaret Caughy, Patricia O'Campo and David A Savitz

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:11

    Content type: Methodology

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  42. Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. About 5.3 million people die every year from stroke worldwide with over 9 million people surviving at any one time after suffering a stroke. About 1 in 4 men an...

    Authors: Ravi Maheswaran, Tim Pearson, Michael J Campbell, Robert P Haining, Cameron W McLeod, Nigel Smeeton and Charles DA Wolfe

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:10

    Content type: Methodology

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  43. We consider how representations of geographic variation in prostate cancer incidence across Southern New England, USA may be affected by selection of study area and/or properties of the statistical analysis.

    Authors: David I Gregorio, Holly Samociuk, Laurie DeChello and Helen Swede

    Citation: International Journal of Health Geographics 2006 5:8

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

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4.134 - 5-year Impact Factor
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